Gitterman Gallery in New York presents Roger Mayne.

Roger Mayne was a British photographer who was probably best known for his work documenting the children of Southam Street in London.

Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne
Roger Mayne

Born in 1929, Mayne found an interest in photography though his studies in chemistry at Balliol College, Oxford University where he met Hugo van Wadenoyen. Hugo van Wadenoyen was a key figure in the new British school of photography that was moving away from the Pictorialism work that had been popular at that time. After graduating in 1951, Mayne began working as a freelance photographer contributing images to the Picture Post. In the early 50’s he made portraits of some of the St. Ives, Cornwall residents which was a prominent artist colony at the time. By 1956 he displayed one-man shows of his portraits at the ICA in the UK and at George Eastman House in Rochester, NY.

From 1955 to 1961, Mayne began working on a personal project producing street photographs on Southam Streen in Notting Dale (now part of Notting Hill). One of these images became the cover shot for Colin MacInnes’ Absolute Beginners (1959) which is set in the same area. This body of work is what Mayne is probably most noted for. Most of the collection is now held by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Southam Street was largely demolished in 1969 in the building of Trellick Tower. By the 1990’s Mayne’s work experienced a new genearation of interest from pop-singer Morrissey. Morrissey used Mayne’s images extensively for stage backdrops, record sleeves and advertisments.

Roger Mayne continued his career working in color and shooting covers for Sunday Times and Observer. He passed away in 2014 leaving an important legacy of work. He is an essential historical figure in street photography and social documentary and one of the prime English figures of the genre.

Gitterman Gallery in New York will feature Roger Mayne on view until January 23, 2016.

41 East 57th Street New York, NY 10022